Kevin Ollie Demands Retraction from UConn, May File Lawsuit

Former University of Connecticut head coach Kevin Ollie intends to “assert claims against the University of Connecticut” for defamation and invasion of privacy after the university released transcripts related to an NCAA investigation, according to ESPN.

Ollie is pursuing $10 million that he believes he’s owed by the school.

Ollie’s legal team demands a retraction from the school, which recently released NCAA transcripts to media outlets in response to a Freedom of Information Act request.

The transcripts included a secondhand claim by former associate head coach Glen Miller that Ollie paid the mother of a former recruit $30,000 in exchange for her son’s commitment.

Ollie’s lawyers want a retraction from the school, claiming that the NCAA transcripts detailed false claims and confidential information that was protected by FOIA laws because it’s related to an ongoing investigation, in addition to personnel matters.

“UConn released the documents in direct response to a Freedom of Information request by Mr. Ollie’s own attorneys,” the school refuted, via ESPN.

“Other parties, including the media, also requested and received these same documents as required by Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in Connecticut. The FOIA, which governs public agencies such as the University, does not permit the selective release of public records to certain parties while denying those same records to others.”

“This false and defamatory claim was released without prior notice to Coach Ollie and no attempt was made by the University of Connecticut to protect Coach Ollie from this false and defamatory claim or to disavow it” Ollie’s legal team, Madsen, Prestley & Parenteau, said.

“The release of the confidential transcripts was coordinated to coincide with the publication of the news that Coach Ollie’s employment was terminated by you on June 19, 2018.”

Ollie’s claim that he’s still owed the $10 million remaining on his contract while the university contends that his alleged violations allowed them to fire him with cause and without any additional payments.

Ollie’s lawyers also claim that the claims made public in the media have hurt Ollie’s reputation.

“The defamatory allegation that Coach Ollie paid $30,000 to the mother of a student athlete published widely by the University of Connecticut constitutes not only defamation but also gives rise to the tort of false light invasion of privacy.”

 

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Anthony DiMoro is a sports writer, podcast host, reporter and founder of DiMoro Sports. Anthony is also the founder of Sports Rants, CEO of Elite Rank Media and sports contributor for Forbes and the Huffington Post